Animal Law Breakfast

June 8th, 2013

shatha hamade
Picture: Jo-Anna Robinson Source: Sunday Mail (SA)

Lawyers for Animals and Victorian Women Lawyers will host an Animal Law discussion on 19 June 2013.

Join us for a vegan breakfast and hear Shatha Hamade speak about the key issues faced by lawyers in advocating for positive animal welfare outcomes through the law.

Shatha is Legal Counsel for Animals Australia. As former Legal Counsel for RSPCA SA, Shatha has extensive experience in animal cruelty investigations and prosecutions. She is the former national coordinator of the Barristers Animal Welfare Panel, a national organisation dedicated to promoting and fostering advocacy for the welfare of animals, and comprising over Australian 100 barristers. In 2012, Shatha was awarded Australian Young Lawyer of the Year by the Law Council of Australia for her significant contribution to animal law and welfare in Australia.

Shatha will address the barriers to reaching the public consciousness and changing community attitudes towards animals. Shatha will also provide a personal account of her experience as an RSPCA prosecutor, to give insight into how and why domestic and production animals are abused in our community, and the systemic issues that we, as lawyers and advocates, need to address to help prevent this cruelty.

Date: Wednesday 19 June 2013
Time: 7.30 am
Venue: Maddocks, 140 William St, Melbourne

Cost:
$15 for VWL and Lawyers for Animals members
$25 for non-members

Click here to register for this event

Kangaroo Culling

Around 30 million Australian kangaroos have been killed over the last decade, and at least three million young left orphaned.

Joeys remain dependent on their mothers for survival for between 18 months and about 3 years. If orphaned joeys are not killed, they die of starvation, exposure, dehydration or predation.

Under the applicable Code of Practice, small, furred pouch young (that are easily held with little struggle) must be euthanased by a forceful blow which destroys the functional capacity of the brain. According to the new Draft Code of Practice, this “may be achieved by forcefully swinging the head of the young against a solid metal object (e.g. tow bar of a vehicle).”


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