Animal Testing

Cruel and painful testing on animals is widespread in medicine, agriculture, pharmaceutics and education. However, the scientific merit and human benefit of many of these tests is contested by numerous scientists.

Amendments to the Code of Practice have seen ‘benchmarks’ implemented calling for the three R’s: reduction (less animals used), replacement (non-animal alternatives) and refinement (ensuring suffering is minimised).

Unfortunately, there is still a long way to go before there is an onus on people to utilise non-animal means of testing – such as the use of proteins from human cells.

5 Responses to “Animal Testing”

  1. site resveratrol Says:

    Maybe you should publish on the subject more often

  2. caitlin Says:

    thanks for that
    want to send us some good stuff to publish?

  3. Calida Says:

    Hi. Very nice Blog. Not really what i have searched over Google, but thanks for the information.

  4. Communications Says:

    That was great information. You have done a great job communicating your message. Keep up the good writing.

  5. caitlin Says:

    Thank you!

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Ultra-fine Wool

Sheep bred especially for ultra-fine wool are kept indoors 24-hours a day for up to five years. This is justified as a way to protect the ‘quality’ of their wool from the elements.

Chronic stress is evident by their continual chewing of their wooden slat fencing and other repetitive behaviours.

Despite a Code of Practice stating that sheep unable to adapt to indoor conditions should be returned to grazing, this rarely occurs, because the definition of ‘unable to adapt’ is too vague.


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