Vic Government announces $100,000 for pet care for domestic violence victims

In an encouraging move, the Victorian Government is taking action to help victims of domestic violence make the decision to leave their abusive partners by providing $100,000 in funding over four years to domestic violence support organisation Safe Steps to provide shelter to victims’ pets.

2012 report provided to the Royal New Zealand Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and the National Collective of Independent Women’s Refuges in New Zealand found cruelty to pets was most commonly reported as a form of punishment, with abusive partners often threatening or inflicting harm to pets as a form means of maintaining control in the relationship or preventing their partners from leaving.

Fears about what may happen to pets that are left behind with abusive partners often cause victims to stay in abusive relationships longer.  However, domestic violence support services have limited capacity to house or care for the pets of women fleeing abusive relationships.  Safe Steps will work with animal welfare agencies like the RSPCA to implement the program.

Read more about this from the Guardian and ABC.

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Horse Racing

The cruelty of horseracing in Australia is usually overlooked due to its social and historical significance.

Racing places enormous pressure on the immature skeletal systems of young horses and regularly leads to lung-bleeding, while a high incidence of stomach ulcers occurs from the high-concentrate grain diets.

Slower or injured horses are routinely discarded by the industry. An estimated 20,000 horses end up at Australian slaughterhouses or ‘knackeries’ each year, with thousands enduring hellish journeys over many days to reach the abattoirs. Much of the horse meat is then shipped to Asia and Europe.


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