Before You Buy That: Ad Campaign

In May 2011, Lawyers for Animals published a series of ads in the Melbourne and Sydney editions of the MX about the suffering of millions of factory farmed animals in Australia, in particular, pigs, chickens and dairy cows.

To find out more about the tragic daily lives of these animals, click on the ads below, and most importantly: think before you buy

“AND ON THAT FARM THERE WAS A PIG…”

And on that farm there was a pig...

Did you know know that pigs are sensitive, intelligent and affectionate animals who love to move freely, forage for food, wallow in mud and socialise?

In the factory farming industry, piglets can have their teeth clipped, their tails cut off, and be castrated without any pain relief when just days old.

Mother pigs are continually impregnated and confined in tiny metal and concrete stalls that are barely larger than their bodies. They have no bedding and are unable to freely nurture or interact with their piglets.

Australian laws allow this to happen. If the same were done to dogs or cats, farmers would be liable to prosecution under prevention of cruelty to animals legislation.

 

Think before you buy and eat bacon, ham or pork.

“AND ON THAT FARM THERE WAS A COW…”

 

And on that farm there was a cow...

Did you know know that dairy cows have been manipulated to produce about ten times more milk than their calves would need per day and suffer health problems including painful udder infections caused by over-milking?

Female cows do not spontaneously produce milk; like human mothers, they only lactate to feed their young. Every year, the Australian dairy industry slaughters approximately 700,000 unwanted dairy calves at around 5 days of age.

Cows are particularly nurturing mothers and are traumatised by watching their newborn babies being dragged away from them. Mother cows call for their missing babies and have been known to escape enclosures and travel for miles to reunite with their young.

Australian laws allow this to happen. If the same were done to dogs or cats, farmers would be liable to prosecution under prevention of cruelty to animals legislation.

 

Think before you buy and eat milk and dairy products.

“AND ON THAT FARM THERE WAS A CHICKEN…”

 

And on that farm there was a chicken..

Did you know know that the factory farming industry raises chickens in barren over-crowded sheds, where they are confined without access to the outdoors, grass or sunlight for their entire lives?

Battery hens who lay eggs routinely have their beaks sliced off with a hot blade just days after hatching. They are confined in tiny cages with not even enough space to stretch their wings.

Chickens raised for meat have been bred to grow so unnaturally fast that they may be crippled before being sent to slaughter at just five weeks of age.

Australian laws allow this to happen. If the same were done to dogs or cats, farmers would be liable to prosecution under prevention of cruelty to animals legislation.

 

Think before you buy and eat eggs and chicken.

FURTHER INFORMATION

For further information on the cruelty of the factory farming industry and what you can do to help, please visit:

voicelessLFA’s advertising campaign in the MX newspapers is made possible by a generous grant from Voiceless: the animal protection institute, through the donation of pro bono graphic design services by Fidelis Design Associates, and thanks to project management by Cybele Stockley and creative assistance of Maya Linden. LFA extends its sincere thanks to everyone involved.
Fidelis Design

While Voiceless has provided financial assistance in connection with this Project, it does not necessarily guarantee the accuracy or completeness of the material provided.

Source: The information provided here has been sourced from the
Animals Australia, Voiceless: the animal protection institute and RSPCA Australia websites, and by reference to the relevant Model Codes of Practice for the Welfare of Animals available via the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry (DAFF) website.

Animal Testing

Cruel and painful testing on animals is widespread in medicine, agriculture, pharmaceutics and education. However, the scientific merit and human benefit of many of these tests is contested by numerous scientists.

Amendments to the Code of Practice have seen ‘benchmarks’ implemented calling for the three R’s: reduction (less animals used), replacement (non-animal alternatives) and refinement (ensuring suffering is minimised).

Unfortunately, there is still a long way to go before there is an onus on people to utilise non-animal means of testing – such as the use of proteins from human cells.


THE LAW

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