Media

ABOUT LFA

Animal law enforcement an ongoing battle for NFPs in Lawyers Weekly (11 September 2017)

Call for new animal cruelty authority in Victoria in Leader Online (5 July 2016)

Melbourne courts hold mock trials during Law Week in Leader Online (7 May 2016)

Animal Law Clinic article in Herald Sun (24 April 2013)

Lawyers dogged about animal rights in The Law Institute Journal (July 2005)

BY LFA

Public Letters and Submissions by LFA

LFA Newsletter – August
This edition contains two pieces on the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) in relation to African lions and the ivory trade respectively.

LFA Newsletter – July
Meet Henry the vegan baby and learn more about our Volunteer Coordinator, Katherine Cooke.

LFA Newsletter – June
Read about the closure of the Bureau of Animal Welfare, the possible emergence of ag-gag laws in Australia, and the ethics and regulation of zoos in an article written by one of LFA’s volunteers.

LFA Newsletter – May
Learn more about our Vice President in our “Member Profile” and read what Will Potter had to say about Ag-Gag laws.

LFA Newsletter – April

LFA Newsletter – March

LFA Newsletter – February

Lawyers for Animals Year In Review
Read about the work of LFA and other animal law developments in 2013.

Before You Buy That: Ad Campaign
LFA’s series of ads in the Melbourne and Sydney editions of MX about the suffering of millions of factory farmed animals in Australia, in particular, pigs, chickens and dairy cows.

Is common law the key to upholding an animal’s right not to suffer? [PDF: 114KB]
LFA in The Australian Law Reform Commission Journal (3 April 2008)

Animal cruelty laws lack punch [PDF: 20KB]
LFA in The Age Newspaper (26 January 2008)

Why do animals need lawyers? [PDF: 150KB]
LFA in the Young Lawyers Journal (2005)

Kangaroo Culling

Around 30 million Australian kangaroos have been killed over the last decade, and at least three million young left orphaned.

Joeys remain dependent on their mothers for survival for between 18 months and about 3 years. If orphaned joeys are not killed, they die of starvation, exposure, dehydration or predation.

Under the applicable Code of Practice, small, furred pouch young (that are easily held with little struggle) must be euthanased by a forceful blow which destroys the functional capacity of the brain. According to the new Draft Code of Practice, this “may be achieved by forcefully swinging the head of the young against a solid metal object (e.g. tow bar of a vehicle).”


THE LAW

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